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Laboratory & Shop Safety

Are you safe?

Play our lab attire Safety Game

Standard Laboratory Safety Rules and Standard Operating Procedures have been developed to ensure the safety of  those who work in and use SCU laboratories. In addition a number of programs and procedures to promote safety in laboratories have also been developed. Please refer to the Laboratory Safety Rules and the following Laboratory Safety Programs.

The Laboratory Safety Programs have been divided into 4 main categories: 

The Chemical Hygiene Plan is the governing Laboratory Safety document for the University. If you work in a Laboratory space please take the time to review this document.

Additional Laboratory Safety programs have also been developed to prevent injuries in Laboratory facilities. Please take the time to review the documents below that pertain to your area. 

The purpose of Biosafety is to protect from health hazards associated with exposure to infectious agents.

Several resources of information are available to help educate the campus community about these possible safety risks. Please take the time to review the documents below that might pertain to your area.

Use of Radioactive Materials at SCU requires approval by the SCU Radiation Safety Officer. 

To obtain approval please fill out the Radioactive Material Approval Form and contact the SCU Radiation Safety Officer

The University has two Radiation Safety Programs

These plans should be reviewed and followed when dealing with the following:

Radioactive Materials - Radioactive means giving off or capable of giving off radiant energy in the form of particles or rays (such as alpha, beta and gamma rays) by the spontaneous disintegration of atomic nuclei. Use of Radioactive Materials at SCU requires approval by the SCU Radiation Safety Officer. The Ionizing Radiation Safety Program can be found here.

Radiation Producing Machines - Radiation-Producing Machines include x-ray diffraction and x-ray fluorescence units, electron microscopes, medical x-ray equipment, particle accelerators, and magnetrons. Procurement and use of Radiation-Producing Machines requires the Radiation Safety Officer's approval. The Ionizing Radiation Safety Program can be found here.

Non-Ionizing Radiation - Non-ionizing Radiation is electromagnetic radiation without enough energy per quantum to ionize atoms or molecules. Examples of Non-ionizing Radiation are: radio frequency and microwaves, infrared radiation, visible light radiation, ultraviolet radiation and lasers. The Non-Ionizing Radiation Program can be found here.